Colin Harrington

Tag: Gnome

Gnome CPU Frequency Scaling Monitor Authorization Policy

by on Mar.27, 2010, under General

After setting up a laptop with Ubuntu, one of the things that I typically like to do is add a the CPU Frequency Scaling Monitor applet (cpufreq-applet) to my main Gnome panel.

I typically work running large web applications (Grails…) that typically use a lot of CPU power when running tests, launching the apps or refactorings within an IDE.  I like the ability to quickly adjust the CPU ‘govenor’ which governs how the CPU is utilized from a power/performance perspective (see CPU Frequency Scaling in Linux for more).

Ubuntu 9.10 (Karmic Koala) uses Gnome 2.28.1 which requires authorization to change the CPU Frequency (which makes sense).  Earlier versions did not require this authorization since it is new in Gnome 2.28.

With policykit-1 (also new in Ubuntu 9.10) you can grant yourself authorization for the cpufreq-applet based on a user or group by creating a policy file (at /var/lib/polkit-1/localauthority/50-local.d/org.gnome.cpufreqselector.pkla for example) that looks something like this:
[org.gnome.cpufreqselector]
Identity=unix-user:YourUser
Action=org.gnome.cpufreqselector
ResultAny=no
ResultInactive=no
ResultActive=yes

Thanks to this post/discussion for pointing this out :-)  be sure you change YourUser to your username or group that you wish to have authorized.

I don’t know of a policy GUI that works with policykit-1 yet, so let me know if you find something.

I also replaced the icons in the /usr/share/pixmaps/cpufreq-applet/ with something I found on  gnome-look.org

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Customizing the Gnome Clock Panel (Ubuntu 8.10)

by on Dec.18, 2008, under Linux, Ubuntu

UbuntuOne of the incredible benefits of running an open source operating system is the fact that you can customize just about everything.

I ran across a posting on Lifehacker about how to Customize your Linux Panel Clock.  The Lifehacker article referenced another article that gives an example of how to customize it with some simple HTML tags and pretty standard time formatter values.  The article isn’t exact for Ubuntu 8.10, but its there if you look for it (/apps/panel/applets/clock_screen0/prefs)  I wasn’t able to get it to do the span tags in Ubuntu 8.10, but it might be more flexible in the near future according to this post.

* Note to self, play around with gconf-editor some more…

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